‘Netflix India’ defaming Hindus and India globally

Netflix is the US-based online streaming service. Almost every series hosted on Netflix India platform is with the intention to paint an incorrect picture of Hindus and India globally. Series like ‘Sacred Games’, ‘Laila’, ‘The Patriot Act’ and ‘Ghoul’ are trying to project India and Hindus as a regressive, militant society.

The many Sins of Netflix

Sacred Games season two

1. The Sacred Games series is produced by Anurag Kashyap. In episode five of season two, titled Vikarna, actor Nawazuddin Siddiqui’s character Ganesh Gaitonde is lured by Pankaj Tripathi’s Guruji, after being introduced to his teachings by Trivedi. Gaitonde is in a particularly vulnerable spot in his life, and Guruji senses this. While in the beginning their equation is shown to be purely ‘guru-shishya’, as the episode goes on, it is revealed that Guruji and Gaitonde develop a sexual relationship as well. This is shown in a quick shot of Guruji and Gaitonde having sex.

Guruji’s ashram is shown to be a sexually fluid place, with unexpected orgies around the corner. Guruji himself is shown engaging in sexual activity with not just Gaitonde, but also his aide, Batya, played by Kalki Koechlin.

The film generalises a revered concept of Guruji in the Bharatiya school of thoughts. The agenda is to demean the Guru-Shishya parampara with overtly sexual gestures.

2. A scene in The Sacred Games in which actor Saif Ali Khan is seen throwing away his kada into the ocean. While reiterating the value of the kada in the Sikh community, Akali Dal MLA Manjinder Singh Sirsa said that Kashyap deliberately included the scene in his show. He wrote, “I wonder why Bollywood continues to disrespect our religious symbols! Anurag Kashyap deliberately puts this scene in ‘Sacred Games 2’ where Saif Ali Khan throws his Kada in sea! A Kada is not an ordinary ornament. It’s the pride of Sikhs and a blessing of Guru Sahib.”

Leila

Similarly, Leila, a web series that indicates an ‘Aryavrat’ will be established in the country. The plaint says. “Aryavrat will be a land of bigots, casteists, Muslim-hating, women-hating patriarchal sect. The term ‘Aryavrat’ is an undertone to suggest that the Hindu Rashtra is/will be of this kind. The SC’s earlier verdict that was recently upheld said that Hindu is a way of life. And to suggest that the way of life will be like a radical cult, is demeaning and hurts our religious sentiments,” the complainant states.

The Patriot Act

The Patriot Act is a web series featuring Hasan Minhaj, an American stand up comic of Indian origin. Hasan Minhaj addresses various issues (mostly pertaining to America and occasionally from across the world) on his show. He has made light of the escalating tensions between India and Pakistan, the heroic efforts of the Indian Air Force during the Balakot strikes, the Indian elections, Prime Minister Modi’s emphasis on building a stronger India, Sadhvi Pragya Thakur’s cancer among many other things. The makers of the show also tried to falsely draw parallels between the aftermath of the abrogation of Art. 370 in Jammu and Kashmir and what is happening in Hong Kong. So while using a peculiar brand of humour to talk about important topics, The Patriot Act also casually slips in anti-India and anti-Hindu rhetoric and manages to convince its audience (predominantly made of youth) that India is a regressive society.

Ghoul

The horror series Ghoul indicates that India, in order to curb terrorism is terrorising Muslims and snatching their fundamental rights, the plaint alleges.

The Indian Army is shown as the one killing people who are considered to be radical but who actually aren’t. Custodial killings has been shown as a routine affair by the Army.

Delhi Crime

Delhi Crime is a series that was conceived to capitalise on the sensation caused due to the infamous Delhi gang-rape of 2012. While the Delhi Police was commended for apprehending the perps within days, the series used its ‘creative freedom’ card to portray one of the police officers instrumental in nabbing the culprits as a bumbling, indifferent idiot. While the real life police officer faced personal tragedies and yet performed his duty diligently, the reel life officer was shown to be shrugging responsibility. One can only surmise that the idea was to show the world that the Indian system is slow, inefficient, corrupt and indifferent.

Netflix shows Kashmir as a part of Pakistan in its show ‘Street Food’

The documentary that recently premiered on Netflix, focuses on street food across Asia including India. India’s street food is talked about in episode 3. However, Netflix displays the wrong map of India showing Kashmir as part of Pakistan.

India’s map shown by Netflix has cut off part of the Indian state Kashmir which is illegally occupied by Pakistan.

To explain things better, following is the real map of Kashmir. In the map, one can clearly see the “Northern Areas – Illegally incorporated with Pakistan”. That is the part of Kashmir which Netflix has cut off from India.

Ramesh Solanki, a member of Shiv Sena IT Cell, has filed a police complaint against Netflix alleging that the US-based online streaming service is “defaming Hindus and India” through shows hosted on its platform.

Hindu Janajagruti Samiti demands that the concern authorities to look into all of the above-mentioned content and ban the Netflix in India.

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